Towards

Art: Paleolithic steppe bison, Cave of Altamira, Spain.

It was only when the third sun rose and the heat became unbearable that she stopped.

As the ritual of sun set began, she crawled from under the grasses and climbed onto her bison — map in one hand, mane in the other. She would ride to the end of the plains and rejoin her father’s people. She would forget the brutal justice of her mother’s kin.

Already, alone, she was feeling whole once more — moving with her bison, in rhythm with the rise and fall of the suns.

She felt the scars on her legs, knew they too would heal.

Heather Bourbeau

Heather Bourbeau

Heather Bourbeau’s latest book, "Daily Palm Castings," is a collection of poems profiling people in often-overlooked professions, and inspired by works by Lyle Lovett, Wim Wenders and Studs Terkel. She is a researcher, analyst, writer and reporter specializing in government policy, human rights, international conflicts, and economic development.
Heather Bourbeau

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