Let Them Eat Cake: The Gross Food Porn of Craig Latchaw

Somewhere between a punk-rock Harvey Kurtzman and R. Crumb guesting on “Top Chef” are Craig Latchaw’s gleefully gross gourmet recipes, seasoned with all the farmworker abuses, assembly-line injuries, and accumulated factory filth of today’s food industry.

The Feast

On the heels of the American Thanksgiving holiday, Britain’s L.P. Lee delivers a timely — and richly told — fable of power and abuse, and asks uncomfortable questions about abundance, scarcity, appetite and satisfaction. Her work is exquisitely illustrated by UK artist Annie Ridd.

A Dream Library: The Art of David Slebodnick

Youngstown, Ohio-based artist David Slebodnick pulls pages out of children’s books from dream libraries. When encountering these works one has the sense of holding a bound volume of them, accompanied by verse or some fabulous narrative to mark the borders between the wakeful day and sleep.

Enigma

Boise, Idaho, author and reference librarian Grove Koger brings us this heady, moody, mythic bit of verse, to inspire your own musings.

In Our Hearts Risen

What do you do with an android that malfunctions? The runaway replicants of Blade Runner might suggest one brutal fate, but Olga Zilberbourg’s Fabulist debut “In Our Hearts Risen” imagines a beautiful alternative.

The Bus Drawings: A 9/11 Survivor’s Diary

9/11 survivor Thomas Haddad’s wildly diverse and phantasmagorical artworks have the mythic detailing of a tarot deck, and a sense of the grotesque that invokes underground comics, Ralph Steadman and Gerald Scarfe.

Krishna

Bay Area poet, professor and publisher Hugh Behm-Steinberg brings us this sweet serenade of a yarn, in which the protagonist’s usurpation of a deity’s musical prerogative brings only more delight to the world.

Household Gods

Detail, "Soothsayer," by Adam Myers

Happy Halloween from The Fabulist, with our first horror story, “Household Gods,” a lurid shocker by Oxford divinities scholar Tara Isabella Burton. It is a dire telling, and the protagonist’s travails are vividly described, caveat lector. Illustration by Adam Myers.

A Secret Mother

Illustration by Adam Myers

Don’t mind the gnawing sense of dread that comes with reading California author John Zic’s chilling Fabulist debut, “A Secret Mother.” It’s an immersive narrative of two teenagers on a certain sort of road trip — and a nerve-wracking spiral into their sociopathic alternate reality.