Origins + Generations

"Daughters of the Northern Lights" - Artist: Gerhard Munthe. Woolen tapestry loosely based on Norse legends and mythology depicting three polar bears approaching three female figures with stylized flame-like blonde hair; stylized waves and mountains in background.

“There once was a polar bear who roamed the great north accompanied by the clouds, his closest friends.” In two new 100-word stories, California author Heather Bourbeau builds a bridge between myth and time.

The Feast

On the heels of the American Thanksgiving holiday, Britain’s L.P. Lee delivers a timely — and richly told — fable of power and abuse, and asks uncomfortable questions about abundance, scarcity, appetite and satisfaction. Her work is exquisitely illustrated by UK artist Annie Ridd.

Enigma

Boise, Idaho, author and reference librarian Grove Koger brings us this heady, moody, mythic bit of verse, to inspire your own musings.

In Our Hearts Risen

What do you do with an android that malfunctions? The runaway replicants of Blade Runner might suggest one brutal fate, but Olga Zilberbourg’s Fabulist debut “In Our Hearts Risen” imagines a beautiful alternative.

Krishna

Bay Area poet, professor and publisher Hugh Behm-Steinberg brings us this sweet serenade of a yarn, in which the protagonist’s usurpation of a deity’s musical prerogative brings only more delight to the world.

Household Gods

Detail, "Soothsayer," by Adam Myers

Happy Halloween from The Fabulist, with our first horror story, “Household Gods,” a lurid shocker by Oxford divinities scholar Tara Isabella Burton. It is a dire telling, and the protagonist’s travails are vividly described, caveat lector. Illustration by Adam Myers.

A Secret Mother

Illustration by Adam Myers

Don’t mind the gnawing sense of dread that comes with reading California author John Zic’s chilling Fabulist debut, “A Secret Mother.” It’s an immersive narrative of two teenagers on a certain sort of road trip — and a nerve-wracking spiral into their sociopathic alternate reality.

The Hospital: A Game for Lovers

Charles Louis Gabriel (1857-1927), medical practitioner and photographer.

Jenny Bitner’s latest yarn is a skewed but compassionate fantasy of love and convalescence, and of real life and death. It is a companion to her earlier contribution to The Fabulist, “Hansel & Me”; both are excerpted from her unpublished novel “Here is a Game We Can Play.”

The Great Farm Painter

California author Tantra Bensko returns to The Fabulist with this surrealist, briskly hallucinogenic vignette, showcasing her vivid prose and loopy, dreamlike plot constructions. (Image source: The Tucson Daily Photo.)