The Feast

On the heels of the American Thanksgiving holiday, Britain’s L.P. Lee delivers a timely — and richly told — fable of power and abuse, and asks uncomfortable questions about abundance, scarcity, appetite and satisfaction. Her work is exquisitely illustrated by UK artist Annie Ridd.

Household Gods

Detail, "Soothsayer," by Adam Myers

Happy Halloween from The Fabulist, with our first horror story, “Household Gods,” a lurid shocker by Oxford divinities scholar Tara Isabella Burton. It is a dire telling, and the protagonist’s travails are vividly described, caveat lector. Illustration by Adam Myers.

Don’t Lose This

Illustration by Adam Myers

Two children receive a gift of memory and magic in “Don’t Lose This,” a short fable by San Francisco author Noah Sanders that explores redemption’s strange and demanding burdens. Illustration by Fabulist house artist Adam Myers.

Under the Porch

By turns eerie and poignant, “Under the Porch” is an oddly sentimental fable of eight young lives marked by the briefest encounter with strangeness and terror. Yet when seen over the span of decades, the supernatural horror at the heart of Julia Patt’s fine telling ends up being almost beside the point. — Editor.

He Knew

by Nora Boydston (Inspired by a strange little fragment from Grimm, Nora Boydston’s “He Knew” plumbs the deep forest of European fairy tales to reveal an unsettling parable of love, loss, and what the modern reader may identify… Read More

Remembrance of Things Past

It has been years since I last made this journey. I am slower and more easily tired. My footfall is not as sure as it used to be, but nor is it as bitter, as sad, as resigned. Up the slope, near the edge of the rock, they stand along the ridge. Waiting, without conversation, silhouetted against the late-afternoon sky.